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Arakan massacres in 1942

 

Arakan massacres in 1942

During World War II, Japanese forces invaded Burma, then under British colonial rule. The British forces retreated and in the power vacuum left behind, considerable inter communal violence erupted between Buddhist Rakhine and Muslim Rohingya villagers. The British armed Rohingyas in northern Arakan to create a buffer zone from Japanese invasion when they retreated.[1]

The period also witnessed violence between groups loyal to the British and Burmese nationalists.[1]

Contents

  • Inter communal violence 1
  • Persecution by the Japanese forces 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Inter communal violence

Aye Chan, a historian at the Kanda University, has written that as a consequence of acquiring arms from the British during World War II, Rohingyas tried to destroy the Arakanese villages instead of resisting the Japanese.[2]

On 28 March 1942, around 5,000 Muslims in Minbya and Mrohaung Townships were killed by Rakhine nationalists and Karenni. Rohingya Muslims from Northern Rakhine State killed around 20,000 Arakanese, including the Deputy Commissioner U Oo Kyaw Khaing, who was killed while trying to settle the dispute.[3]

Persecution by the Japanese forces

Defeated, 40,000 Rohingya eventually fled to the Chittagong Division of Bangladesh after repeated massacres by the Burmese and Japanese forces.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Field-Marshal Viscount William Slim (2009). Defeat Into Victory: Battling Japan in Burma and India, 1942–1945. London: Pan.  
  2. ^ Chan ( 
  3. ^ Kyaw Zan Tha, MA (July 2008). "Background of Rohingya Problem". p. 1. 
  4. ^ Asian profile, Volume 21. Asian Research Service. 1993. p. 312. Retrieved 12 April 2011. 

External links

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